Scenes from Egypt

At the time we lived in Cairo, there was little stationery and few cards, calendars etc available.

I have always had a love of art, and like to paint and draw and was asked to contribute to a calendar being produced by one of the British community groups to raise funds for a local charity.

These pen and ink drawings were chosen for two of the twelve months:

Cotton Pickers at Thebes

Egyptian Village on the Nile

 

There was also a shortage of greetings cards, so I designed my own and sold many of them.

Below are some of the cards, which I drew from scenes of Egyptian life whilst I was out and about in Cairo and the countryside:

Around the Desert Campfire

 

I noticed these three men sitting in the desert near the pyramids at Saqqara and I quickly set about sketching them.

They soon noticed me drawing, but didn’t seem to mind at all and didn’t change their attitudes or positions, which was lovely – they seemed so relaxed.

 

Street Melon Seller in Cairo

Spring Onion and Lemon Seller in Cairo

 

This was a very frequent sight in Cairo and I often bought my vegetables and fruit from these street vendors.

The melons were huge – the biggest I have ever seen.  They were juicy and delicious. A bath was usually needed after eating them if care was not taken!

 

This lady was making her living by selling spring onions and lemons.  The pot to the left of her was a common sight – they were for water (there is a small cup on top) and were slightly porous, which I was told helped keep the water cool as it evaporated.

Unfortunately, once she spotted me, she became self-conscious and sat bolt upright and stared straight at me – as you see.

water-carriers1

Water Carrier at Sunset

 

Seeing ladies carrying water like this was also very common as there was sometimes little, if any running water in the villages.

I spotted this lady make her way home one evening as we were leaving the Fayoum Oasis. The setting sun added to what was such an evocative scene.

Egyptian ladies could also been seen carrying their babies on their shoulders and even in baskets on their heads occasionally!  It always terrified me to witness it but the babies seems quite happy.

I hope you have enjoyed seeing this small collection from some of my work from Egypt.  

Jan

Advertisements